Tag Archives: nick’s class

Monday Night Irish Class, September 8, 2008

Irish Class, September 8, 2008

Irish Class, September 8, 2008

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Our new instructor is Wes Koster.

Predictably, we started with:

Céard a rinne sibh ar feadh an tsamhraidh?
What did you do during the summer?

Céard a rinne sibh na laethanta saoire?
What did you do in the free days

When my turn came, I answered the second question, only exaggerating slightly:

Ní raibh laethanta saoire agam. Bhí mé an gnotach san oifig.
I did not have
free days. I was very busy in the office.

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Monday Night Irish Class, August 4, 2008

Irish Class, August 4, 2008

Irish Class, August 4, 2008

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Nick had spend much of July at an advanced Irish course in Dublin,
and tonight he gave us a couple samples of what he had learned.

Old Irish

This was a gloss in the St. Gall Priscian 9th
century codex mss in Switzerland, as printed in Thurneysen’s
Old Irish Reader. There some web formatting issues with the notation. It does not display correctly in all browsers. FireFox 3 is fine, but IE 6 and the version of Opera on the Nokia 770 have problems.

A Stormy Night
Is acher in gaith in-nocht
fu.fūasna fairggæ findḟolt:

ni.ágor réimm Mora Minn
dond láechraid lainn ūa Lothlind.
The wind is rough tonight
tossing the white combed ocean.
I need not dread fierce Vikings
crossing the Irish Sea.

The translation is from The Forgotten Hermitage of Skellig Michael.
The monks of Skellig Michael certainly would have appreciated the sentiment of “A Stormy Night”,
even though the author may not have been one of them.

Notes and vocabulary

A note on classical literary Gaelic/Early Modern Irish

In last Monday night’s Irish class we talked about Classical Gaelic Poetry from the
early modern (1200-1650 AD) period. I mentioned that I had run across a description
of some of the rules. I found it in

Gàir Nan Clàrsach – The Harps’ Cry: Anthology of 17th Century Gaelic Poetry
. The
book is about Scottish Gaelic, but this form of poetry, and the language was common to
both Gaelic Scotland and Ireland in the period. The poets who produced these works had been trained in the genre for years. Their work was aimed at the Gaelic elite, and traditionally they were supported as court poets by the clan chiefs and great lords. Here is a verse from Niall Mòr Mac
Muireadhigh’s Do Ruaidhri Mòr, Mac Leòid (“To Ruaidhri Mòr”), followed by the analysis in the
introduction to the book.

Fiche meisge linn gach laoi –
nochar leisge linn ná lé;
fiú i neart ar mbeathaidh do bhí
ceathair, a trí, a seacht le sé.

Description of the rules as applied to this verse

Yikes!

Next weekend I am going to Gaeltacht Minnesota‘s workshop in Winona, like I did a year ago. The workshop is split into sections based on experience/ability.

Today the instructor of my section sent an e-mail to everybody in it. The contents were not surprising, but the address list really got my attention. As I expected, there were two of my Monday night classmates from this past year, but I also recognized the address of one of Will’s students (i.e., from the advanced class) and that of a GM instructor. So it looks like the powers that be have placed me in an upper level group. I am flattered and scared.

Monday Night Irish Class, June 30, 2008

Irish Class, June 30, 2008

Irish Class, June 30, 2008

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We have a class project for the summer: To translate a menu into
Irish. Each of us chose one item. I got:

Minnesota wild rice
stuffed chicken breast

I first reworded the English to
be

Breast of chicken with stuffing of wild rice
from Minnesota

Which I translated
as

Cíoch sicín le buiste ríc fiáin as
Minnesota

grammatical note

Irish Class–Monday Night, June 16, 2008

Irish Class, June 16, 2008

Irish Class, June 16, 2008

The big news is that Nick is leaving us in August. He got a job out east. It has been a great year, and we will miss him. However, he is a new Ph.D. in History, and we have to be happy that he has a job in his field.

From Nick’s class
page
:

“….listen to a set of verbs and nouns that have an
initial mutation (usually lenition, but not always), recognize the root
word, and write down that root. “

The words