Tag Archives: church

Columbus and the Flat Earth

Inventing the Flat Earth: Columbus and Modern Historians, by Jeffrey Burton Russell, is the book for the day. Columbus did not show the world that the Earth was round. No educated European in 1492 believed that the Earth was flat. They all knew it was round. As all math geeks know, Eratosthenes of Cyrene had made a good calculation of the circumference of the Earth about 200 BCE.

Catholic church authorities did not say that the plan of Columbus to reach the orient by sailing westward was impossible because the Earth was flat. Their scholastic theology was based on the philosophy of Aristotle, who understood perfectly well that the Earth was round.

There are passages in the Bible that suggest a flat Earth, but almost all theologians of ancient and medieval times knew the evidence for a round Earth was overwhelming, and understood the Bible was not to be taken literally in this and similar cases.

The objection to the plans of Columbus was that, thanks to Eratosthenes, people had a good idea of the distance from the west coast of Europe to the east coast of China, and could easily calculate that no ship of the day could possibly carry enough supplies for the voyage.

Columbus, acting like a 21st century Republican, rejected the best science of the day and chose a smaller alternative value for the circumference that suited his purposes. He was just lucky that the Americas happened to be there. As a result their inhabitants were then horribly unlucky.

The story about Columbus and the flat Earth is a 19th century invention, not history.

Also posted on Facebook.

Patience: Sermon Notes

Notes from a sermon by the Rev. Jennifer Allred at St. Clement’s Episcopal Church, St. Paul, MN. Third Sunday of Advent, December 15, 2019. Any errors, mistakes, misinterpretations, etc. are my responsibility, not the Rev. Allred’s.

Largely about the need for patience, directly referring to the Epistle. It is the call of the Advent Season. “We want everything just about now.” The Rev. Phillips Brooks said “The trouble is that I’m in a hurry, but God isn’t.” The Rev. Allred also quoted from the “Romero Prayer,” which apparently was not actually composed by Archbishop Romero.

A techie note from church

This morning in Church it was my turn to read the lesson from the Hebrew scriptures, about Joseph being sold to the Ishmaelites for 20 pieces of Silver (Genesis 37). I also read the assigned part
of Psalm 105, where this story also comes up.

17 He sent a man before them, *
Joseph, who was sold as a slave.
18 They bruised his feet in fetters; *
his neck they put in an iron collar.

I saw the phrase “iron collar” and my mind immediately went “Anachronism!”. Continue reading

Too many books

In Church this morning some announced that there was a group being formed to read and discuss the recent book Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth. I have heard good things about this and my first reaction was Sure, I should get the book, read it, and join the group. My second thought was Wait a minute, I am reading several books already. My third thought was Just how many books am I reading now? So I made a list. Here it is, in no particular order or organization:

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CSI: Bosworth Field, and related matters

… the final moments of Richard III’s life…

On a related note, Richard III’s body becomes subject of rival claims from Leicester and York

In case you were wondering: Why the princes in the tower are staying six feet under.

“The recent discovery of Richard III does not change the abbey’s position, which is that the mortal remains of two young children, widely believed since the 17th century to be the princes in tower, should not be disturbed.”

Pentecost

Pentecost, May 27, 2012

Lá na Cincíse, 27ú lá Mí na Bealtaine 2012

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Fadas: áéíóúÁÉÍÓÚ

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This past Sunday was Pentecost. At St. Mary’s,
as I have seen elsewhere, a tradition is to read one one of the lessons in multiple languages. I volunteered to read
in Irish. We read the Gospel, after our Deacon introduced it. The Irish translation is from An Bíobla Naofa.
Léigh tuilleadh

What the Norwegian shooter believes, in his own words

From
The Norway Massacre: Born of Ideology or Belief?
via

From Arne Fjeldstad: Belief? Ideology? Faith?”

It is not required that you have a personal relationship with God or Jesus in order to fight for our Christian cultural heritage and the European way. In many ways, our modern societies and European secularism is a result of European Christendom and the enlightenment. It is therefore essential to understand the difference between a “Christian fundamentalist theocracy” (everything we do not want) and a secular European society based on our Christian cultural heritage (what we do want).

The European cultural heritage, our norms (moral codes and social structures included), our traditions and our modern political systems are based on Christianity – Protestantism, Catholicism, Orthodox Christianity and the legacy of the European enlightenment (reason is the primary source and legitimacy for authority).

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