Jammy Jellyfish

I upgraded my Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa) to 22.04.1 (jammy jellyfish), the current LTS release, last week. I simply followed the prompts from the Software Upgrader. The updates succeeded and the systems are completely useable, but there were a couple glitches.

On one system the updater managed to reverse the left and right positions of the two monitors. This was trivial to fix.

The other system is the one I use the most in my daily work. The upgrade actually hung during the cleanup phase. Eventually I rebooted, hoping for the best. In fact it did come up cleanly as 22.04.1. I was able to get the cleanup done by:

sudo apt update
sudo apt dist-upgrade  

The latter simply gave a long list of packages that could be removed, suggesting that I do so by sudo apt autoremove, which I proceeded to do. This is not surprising since the upgrade hung in the cleanup process.

One thing I quickly noticed with the new version was that all my linux drives showed up in the dock. Since my systems are set up to boot windows and multiple linux versions, this resulted in a lot of clutter in the dock. How to Hide Mounted Drives on the Ubuntu Dock (Quick Guide) told me how to remove them. What I would really like would be to whitelist the two drives I use most, and hide the rest. I have not yet figured out how to do this.

Firefox is now a snap. The annoying thing is that I had to redo my configuration changes. Fortunately, I did not have a lot of these.

Also, the screenshot tool in the new version is really nice. I have already put it to good use.

Back in my working days, we were taught never to upgrade an OS in place. Always do a fresh install. That would have been a lot of work for my home systems. I think I got away with the upgrades in place this time, but I don’t think I should push my luck in two years when the next Ubuntu LTS releases comes out. At that point, however, I will probably get new hardware. My computers are quite old. They run Windows 10 OK, but when I use it I get warned that Windows 11 will not run on them.

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